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2 edition of Investigations into the use of a trap crop tp protect cotton from attack by Lygus vosseleri (Heteroptera: Miridae) found in the catalog.

Investigations into the use of a trap crop tp protect cotton from attack by Lygus vosseleri (Heteroptera: Miridae)

G. O. Stride

Investigations into the use of a trap crop tp protect cotton from attack by Lygus vosseleri (Heteroptera: Miridae)

by G. O. Stride

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Published by Cotton Research Corporation in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby G.O. Stride.
SeriesCotton Research Corporation Research memoirs -- no.79
ContributionsCotton Research Corporation.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18334936M

A trap crop barrier on all sides is useful when it is necessary to protect the crop from a pest attack that may come from several or unknown directions. This technique works best against pests that tend to damage the crop along the edge of the field (at least initially) rather than those that tend to have a random distribution throughout the crop. Cotton is a major crop in parts of the African Tropics, Australia, China, Egypt, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Soviet Union, the Sudan, United States, and warmer regions of Central and South America. Diseases have always been a problem wherever cotton is grown.

An effective trap crop must be significantly more attractive to an insect pest than the cash crop for a significant duration of the crop cycle. Furthermore, the costs associated with the trap crop must be less than the benefits of increased yield in the cash crop (Shelton and Badenes-Perez ; Michaud et al. ). In recent years, trap crops. Trap Cropping in Pest Management. Annual Review of Entomology Vol. new methods of estimating global species richness have been developed and existing ones improved through the use of more appropriate statistical tools and new data. Taking the mean of most of these new estimates indicates that globally Read More. Full Text HTML;.

Click on photos to enlarge; Lygus nymph Lygus bug Identification tip: Lygus bug adults are about inch (6 mm) long, inch ( mm) wide, and flattened on the back. They vary in color from pale green to yellowish brown with reddish brown to black markings and . Table 2. Expected occurrence of insect and mite pests in cotton Crop growth stage Common pests Occasional pests Emergence to 1st square Thrips, wireworms Aphids, spider mites, cutworms 1st square to bloom Aphids, cotton fleahopper, plant bugs (verde plant bug, Lygus) Spider mites, bollworm After 1st bloom Bollworm, plant bugs, stink bugs, fall.


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Investigations into the use of a trap crop tp protect cotton from attack by Lygus vosseleri (Heteroptera: Miridae) by G. O. Stride Download PDF EPUB FB2

The border strip may be used as a trap crop if lygus bug numbers are very high and threaten to move into cotton. If needed treat with an insecticide. Broad-spectrum insecticides should be avoided where possible to protect natural enemies.

A trap crop is a plant that attracts agricultural pests, usually insects, away from nearby crops. This form of companion planting can save the main crop from decimation by pests without the use of pesticides. While many trap crops have successfully diverted pests off of focal crops in small scale greenhouse, garden and field experiments, only a small portion of these plants have been shown to.

 Increase productivity Trap Crops Trap crops are grown as a control measure to lure pests away from the cash crop to protect it from attack. Pests are either prevented from reaching the crop or concentrated in certain parts of the field away from the main Size: KB.

The trap crop plants can be planted at the corners, at some distance ( ft.) from the cash crop. On a commercial farm, for cucurbits grown using plastic mulch and drip irrigation then we recommend you transplant Blue Hubbard squash seedlings to both ends of each row.

A classic example of the use of trap crops is the interplanting of strips of alfalfa among larger blocks of cotton (Stern ). The alfalfa strips make effective trap crops in this system because they are more attractive to Lygus spp.

and spider mites than the blocks of alfalfa. The main drawback with this tactic is that most of the area used. Trap crops: A tool for managing insect pests damage Trap crops are those crops which are planted along with the main cash crop to protect it from a specific pest or several pests by attracting them for feeding, breeding and survival.

These crops are generally planted along the main crop. Trap crops: Some cotton pests prefer crops like maize, sunflower, okra (lady finger), sorghum, pigeon pea or hibiscus to growing these crops along with cotton as a trap crop, the cotton crop is spared.

In Tanzania, experience has shown that sunflower is an efficient trap crop. Lygus trait cotton. The researchers also provided insight about the new lygus trait in cotton and some data related to a trial they conducted this year. “Lygus is the genus name for tarnished plant bug,” says Stewart. “We learned early on working with this trait how well it worked to prevent thrips injury.”.

Therefore, the trap crop will serve as a food source or ovi position. The trap crop will then divert the pest from the main crop so that, it can be destroyed in the trap crop if necessary. Alfalfa has been used as a trap crop for Lygus bugs in cotton. The highly attractive varieties of squash have also been used as a trap crop to manage squash bugs.

Stride GO () Investigations into the use of a trap crop to protect cotton from attack by Lygus vosseleri (Heteroptera: Miridae). J Entomol Soc S Afr – Google Scholar. TRAP CROPPING LYGUS BUGS At the end of the s, lygus bugs, a key pest of cotton in California, were shown to prefer lushly growing alfalfa over cotton, and strips of this crop interspersed in cotton fields virtually eliminated the need to spray the main crop for lygus control (72, 77, 78).

of California in the s, is the use of alfalfa as a trap crop for lygus bugs in cotton (40, ). This example is remarkable because it is still used today at the commercial level.

Other examples of con ventional trap cropping in commercial Annu. Rev. Entomol. Downloaded from by on. Trap cropping is the planting of a trap crop to protect the main cash crop from a certain pest or several pests. The trap crop can be from the same or different family group, than that of the main crop, as long as it is more attractive to the pest.

There are two types of planting the trap crops; perimeter trap cropping and row intercropping. Cotton is the collective name given to four species of plants in the genus Gossypium, Gossypium hirsutum, Gossypium barbadense, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium herbaceum which are perennial shrubs in the family Malvaceae grown for the fluffy fiber which protects the seeds of the plant.G.

hirsutum accounts for approximately 90% of world wide cotton production today. Most gardeners have experienced the disappointment of carefully raising a vegetable crop only to have it damaged or destroyed by an invasion of pests such as slugs, aphids or other bugs.

The traditional advice in such situations is to heavily spray crops with pesticides but many of us prefer to use nature's own organic controls for the food we are going to eat.

Trap cropping is one of those. Cultural Practices. Trap crops, usually consisting of early-planted mustard, rape, or kale are sometimes recommended to divert the overwintering bugs from the principal trap crops must be sprayed or destroyed, however, or the adults will soon move to the main crop.

Destruction of crop residues, on which the insect may overwinter in the north or oversummer in the south, is an.

In all 15 of these fields, corn was effective as a trap crop and the infestation of cotton declined sharply with the beginning of silking." Strip or trap crops can be the breeding grounds for beneficial arthropod wildlife that migrates, is forced (e.g.

by cutting) or transferred (by D-Vac suction collection) to nearby cotton. Trap cropping has indicated benefits in terms of economic returns on an average of per cent increase in net profits mainly resulting from reduced insecticide use and pest attack. Trap crops are the plant stands that are grown to attract insects or other organisms to protect target crops from pest attack.

Protection may be. Buying organic cotton has a number of benefits, including helping to keep pesticides out of our food supply. Few people realize it, but only 35 percent of the cotton harvest is turned into cloth.

The seed, which is crushed and separated into oil, meal and hulls, comprises nearly 60 percent. Teaching, Research, Extension and Service. Creontiades Plant Bug - Creontiades nymphs are similar in appearance to cotton fleahopper but are generally larger and have red stippling on their antennae through the 3rd instar.

Major Insect of cotton 1. Prepared By: Bishnu Prasad Ghimire 2. INTRODUCTION Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in boll, or protective capsule, around the seeds of cotton plants of the genes Gossypium.

Cotton (Gossypium spp), the king of fibers, usually commercial referred as white gold and one of the important commercial crops, plays a pivotal role in human civilization. The new Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) technology, which is being developed by Monsanto, is commonly referred to as the "Lygus trait" because it was originally developed to protect cotton from.